2.28.13 The Killing Field

Killing 790 xxx
photos by gluttonforlife

Hope is the thing with feathers
by Emily Dickinson

Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,

And sings the tune without the words,


And never stops—at all,



 

And sweetest—in the Gale—is heard,


And sore must be the storm


That could abash the little bird


That kept so many warm,



 

I've heard it in the chillest land—


And on the strangest sea;


Yet, never, in extremity,


It asked a crumb—of me.

Feathers 790 xxx
natural selection
This little tableau of death was laid out in stark contrast to the freshly fallen snow on our front path. The red was so intense that at first I thought an animal had managed to unearth some berries or rosehips from beneath the frozen crust. Then I saw the flurry of tiny feathers. There were no tracks in the snow, so a bird of prey—hawk? owl?—had probably swooped down and nabbed this victim in mid-flight. It happens every day. One moment a mourning dove is cooing its soothing song, the next it meets a silent end of quick violence. This tale of killing/dying/eating is an ancient one. Nature is cruel and beautiful in equal measure.
Blood 790 xxx
the crimson
Join me in raising a toast to the fallen bird, to its predator and to the eternal dance between the two.
 

Corpse Reviver No. 2

from Jim Meehan's "The PDT Cocktail Book" by way of
Harry Craddock's "The Savoy Cocktail Book," 1930
makes 1 cocktail
  • Vieux Pontarlier Absinthe
  • — 3/4 oz Plymouth gin
  • — 3/4 oz Cointreau
  • — 3/4 oz Lillet Blanc
  • — 3/4 oz lemon juice

"Four of these taken in swift succession will unrevive the corpse again."

Rinse a coupe with the absinthe and chill well. Shake all remaining ingredients with ice and strain into the chilled glass. No garnish.

Download recipe  Download Recipe
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7 Comments

No need for a garnish - your words have painted a very clear picture. Sounds fabulous .
Mona Wise on February 28, 2013 at 1:05 pm — Reply
Thanks, Mona - all the way from Ireland! You are most welcome here.
laura on February 28, 2013 at 1:11 pm — Reply
Never thought that I would find a culinary blog so interesting (I really prefer dining to preparing food) but again I must let you know how this article moved me. How ironic..a chilling picture followed by a poem bringing a rush of warm memories. Dickinson was my deceased mom's favorite poet!
adah nicklin on March 1, 2013 at 8:36 am — Reply
Thanks, Adah! I don't really think about Glutton for Life as a culinary blog per se, mostly because I try to offer a fuller perspective on the world...
laura on March 1, 2013 at 9:09 am — Reply
and you definitely do!
adah nicklin on March 1, 2013 at 9:27 am — Reply
...I'm shedding tears as I write this Laura; you are such a favorite in my life. A few weeks ago my cat, Misha, bid me goodbye after 17 years. He was my beloved companion, and his loss has raised so many questions for me at 72 years old. I don't know what to think about death and dying. Thank you for this post and, always, your wise, insightful thoughts about life, and living. There comes a time when we all must say goodbye to this world of such cruelty, and such beauty. Keep pinning my dear! I enjoyed your pottery posts, and precious white owl. xo
Susan on March 6, 2013 at 10:26 am — Reply
Susan, I am so sad to hear of Misha's demise. I fear the day I will have to part with my beloved Titi. I believe that life is a mystery and death is the answer. In the meantime, there is always Pinterest for us to share our dreams and delights! xo
laura on March 6, 2013 at 11:21 am — Reply